BSRIA’s Information Centre – Delivering Knowledge for the Future.

image028The traditional view of libraries is somewhat staid but BSRIA hopes to buck the trend with a keen, energetic team who is constantly thinking ‘out of the box’ and looking for new ways to deliver information. Blogs, tweets, apps, newsletters, YouTube videos and webinars – you name it – are just some of our newer services.
Our mantra is “How can we deliver value to our members and customers?” How do we deliver what you want and need without information overload, and how can we continually make our services fresh and interesting?
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This is where you, as members and customers, are pivotal. This is your information service and you need to tell us what you’d like. Call us on 01344 465571, or email: information@bsria.co.uk.

WHO ARE WE AND WHAT DO WE DO?

Click on our mini video to find out more about us:

 

image009 HISTORY

In brief, we offer the largest dedicated building services library in Europe, with
over 80,000 items. Started in 1955, and originally part of the Heating Ventilating Research Association (HVRA), BSRIA’s information centre has grown from small beginnings and amassed stock from various other specialist libraries, along the way. This year we are proud to celebrate our 60th Anniversary.

Our current online library of books and journal abstracts was originally inherited from the
National College for Heating, Ventilating, Refrigeration and Fan Engineering in 1960 and has been maintained and updated by BSRIA ever since. During this time there have been some key
milestones such as computerising our catalogue in 1980; launching our ‘Statistics Bulletin’ (now Business Bulletin) in 1976; and moving to a new information centre, also in 1976.

image009 SO WHO IS RUNNING THE LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES NOW?


Who answers enquiry when you call or email? Meet the team: Jayne, Nevena, Jo and Maria.

Jayne Jo Maria Web

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Welcome to Jayne Sunley, BSRIA’s new Information Manager.

Some of you will have spoken to Jayne on the phone or communicated on email, but have you wondered what she is really like?

Jayne, tell us a bit about yourself

Well, I was born and raised in Corby, Northamptonshire or as some people like to call it little Scotland. I graduated from university in 2012 with a BA (Hons) in History and found my way to BSRIA where I’ve been ever since. I started as Information Assistant but I’ve recently been fortunate enough to be given the opportunity to lead our Information Centre.

What is the best thing about working at BSRIA?

By far the best thing about BSRIA is the people, staff and members alike. As cheesy as it sounds it’s rather like joining a family, the support network is there throughout.

What plans do you have for BSRIA’s library?

There are a few plans in the making for the Information Centre in coming years both internally and externally. We’re intending to improve our e-delivery services as well as introduce a new legislation service for our members. Internally we will be amalgamating the library into one system as opposed to several organisation methods we have now. There is also an intranet development project in the making.
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What is your favourite food and
drink?

I have a real weakness for anything Italian. Drink wise I’d have to say Irn Bru but I think that’s due to being half-Scottish.

What do you enjoy doing in your free time?

I’m currently studying for my MSc in Library Science so a lot of my free time is spent on reading an awful lot. But for purely enjoyment purposes I like to swim and going to gigs.

Where will you be for Christmas?

For Christmas this year I’ll be heading back towards home which is Northamptonshire where I’ll be consuming too much chocolate.

What films/books/music do you like?

I’m a big fiction fan ranging from classics to science fiction but sadly don’t get as much time to indulge anymore. Music is a big part of my life but it tends to be more rock or indie orientated whatever that means!

 

 FIND YOUR WAY AROUND OUR INFORMATION SERVICES AT A GLANCE:- image007

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Safety in Building Services Design

This is a guest post by Richard Tudor of WSP

This is a guest post by Richard Tudor of WSP

Space, and the cost of providing space, for plant and building services  distribution is at a premium and designers often come under pressure to reduce the spatial requirements for building services installations. In order to discharge their obligations, designers must take care to provide safe means of access for installation, maintenance and equipment replacement.  In addition designers need to be aware of the regulations and legislation requirements that a design may impose on the installer and end user as a design solution can often impose additional legal

responsibilities, particularly in undertaking associated operation and maintenance activities. However, the active and continuing attention to safe access issues, throughout the design stages, is not always achieved as the designers’ attention can often concentrate on what is perceived to be more immediate concerns.

BSRIA’s publication Safety in Building Services Design BG55/2014 has just been published which provides guidance on designing for safety in both new and refurbishment projects.

The publication is aimed at designers and includes information on:

  • relevant legislation including CDM
  • hazards and risks including managing risk in the design process
  • understanding space requirements and access provision
  • designing for maintenance
  • plant room design
  • communication of risk information including representation of risk information on drawings
BG55/2014 Safety in Building Services Design

BG55/2014 Safety in Building Services Design

However, the diversity in type, configuration and possible location of plant, means it is not possible for this publication to give definitive guidance for all installations.

The publication provides a practical guide to assist the design process, aid design reviews together with providing a better understanding in designing for safety.  For example, included in the publication is a checklist on the considerations in designing for health and safety which can be used as part of the technical design quality review process.  In the pdf version of the publication this is included in an editable Excel format. Influencing factors, considerations and space requirement data useful in the design decision process with respect to providing safe access are highlighted in the publication.

The poor provision of safe access for maintenance could result in an increased likelihood of cutting corners or omission of maintenance and repair activities. This in turn, could result in building services failures that could adversely affect safety, legal compliance, productivity and quality of the environment.

BSRIA launches a new course on the 12th November 2014 providing guidance in designing for health and safety in the space planning of building services with respect to operation, maintenance and plant replacement. The course is intended for professionals involved in the design of building services but is equally relevant to contractors and other professionals within the industry. Young engineers in particular would benefit from the course.

On completion of the course delegates will be able to:

  • understand the specific considerations with respect to designing for safety for building services
  • identify discipline specific considerations in designing for safety
  • challenge designs in relation to health and safety in the design, construction and operations of building services so as to improve performance
  • understand relevant H&S legislation, codes of practice and guidance
  • understand the relationship between building services design and maintenance operations
  • understand the management of hazard and risk together with control strategies
  • locate information relating to health and safety to assist in design process
  • understand the consequences of failing to manage health and safety effectively
  • understand the importance of communication and provision of information in the design process

Richard Tudor is a Senior Technical Director at WSP and has been an integral part of the WSP Group Technical Centre for over 14 years. His responsibilities include technical quality, specification development, technical knowledge management, delivering training, designing for safety, providing technical support, and improving project delivery.

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