In industrial applications gas boilers are still important while renewables are growing slowly


BSRIA has researched the market of industrial boilers
– boilers used for industrial processes and/or district heating in seven major countries: the UK, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Russia and China.

Despite dynamic progress on renewables in many other heating markets, gas boilers still remain the most prominent product in the industrial segment.

The use of ground to water, water to water heat pumps and energy from waste heat is growing and they are increasingly becoming installed in a primary system. However, gas and to a lesser extent, oil or biomass boilers are used most often as a secondary source for a backup system to either provide an operational safety related redundancy level or to support the peak load demand.

Gas boilers still benefit from lower investment cost and even though technologies that use renewable energy sources are increasing their penetration in the industrial segment, current research supports the view that gas boilers will keep playing a significant role in the market in the next decade.

China, with its nearly 50,000 units sold per year is the largest among the researched markets.  Following government push towards reduction of air pollution, there is a significant shift in sales from coal to gas boilers. The country has a preference for large output boilers while in Western Europe BSRIA sees the opposite trend, with smaller capacity, condensing boilers gaining significance.

boilers

Heat networks are an important and growing segment for industrial boilers; they accounted for some 20% of all industrial boilers sold in 2018. In all seven researched countries, industrial processing in chemical, food and cement industries is also growing in prominence.

As technology progresses the value of the industrial boiler market is growing, moreover, in all countries the service and maintenance part of the business is also growing significantly. Focus on energy efficiency supports the trend towards regular seasonal check and more frequent upgrades.

In terms of technology, most industrial boilers sold in the researched countries are fire tube units.

By Socrates Christidis,
Senior Market Analyst, Worldwide Marketing Intelligence, BSRIA Ltd


Notes to editors:

 

To find out more, please contact us at:

The European BACS Market – Looking Up?

 

BSRIA’s Worldwide Market Intelligence has just published updates to its Building Automation Controls (BACS) studies for four key Western European Markets: Germany, Spain, the Netherlands and Belgium.

The studies confirm that, while each market has some special characteristics, there are some important common trends.

As of February 2020, BSRIA was forecasting strong growth in all four markets, though unfolding events, including the coronavirus, could have an adverse impact. In the period 2019- 2024 the forecast ranges from 3.1% to 4.8% CAGR depending on the country. The strongest growth is forecast for Belgium and Spain, reflecting in part the economic recovery after a difficult period in the latter.

Forecast Growth for Four Key European BACS Markets: % CAGR 2019 – 2024

BACS market 2019-2024

Source: BSRIA Research

 

The effects of economic conditions are currently open to a lot of uncertainty, especially given the possible impact of the coronavirus pandemic which, according to some analysts, could potentially spark a serious global recession. The UK’s exit from the European Union still leaves considerable uncertainty about the long-term relationship between the two parties as negotiations for a new trade deal have started with substantial differences of opinion in many key areas.

However, there are some clear technology developments that are driving change, supporting building controls markets.

Software and analytics are becoming increasingly important and strategic. In three of the four markets, BACS software is growing faster in value than the total BACS market. In Germany and Spain, the growth for this segment is twice as fast. Since software is increasingly bundled with the wider service offering the actual importance of software to BACS is even greater than the crude sales “numbers” for software suggest. Increasingly, the quality and value of a BACS supplier’s products and services will depend on the capabilities of the software deployed to manage a building more intelligently and proactively.

While there is a move to the Cloud and more specifically to Software as a Service (SaaS), the great majority of software sold remains server-based, ranging from 75% in Spain to more than 90% in Germany, the latter figure reflecting the cautious nature of much of the German market.

Controllers, particularly DDC controllers are increasingly freely programmable, with the vast majority of all products being at least configurable. This enables controllers to be used for a wider range of applications and scenarios.

The advance of the Internet of Things is reflected in the fact that, increasingly, field devices are capable of being easily connected to the internet. This is especially true of larger and more complex devices. In all four markets, BSRIA research found that over 60% of Air Conditioning Units had an inbuilt capability of being connected to the internet. However, this capability was currently being used only in a minority of cases where there was a direct benefit in connecting to the net.

One key measure of the move towards “smarter” buildings is the extent to which HVAC, which has traditionally been the core application of BACS, has converged with other key building systems, allowing common and coordinated control. For example, to maximise energy efficiency while maintaining a comfortable working environment it makes sense to manage HVAC, lighting and blinds via a common system.

Our research showed that while convergence is increasing, in Germany and Belgium the majority of new buildings with BACS still focused purely on HVAC applications. While, BACS refurbishment or retrofit projects were less likely to be converged, a substantial and growing minority are now linking HVAC with other building services.

In key European Markets, BACS projects are showing increasing convergence

European BACS Markets showing increasing convergence

Source: BSRIA research in Belgium, Germany, Netherlands and Spain – 2019

 

In all the markets researched the BACS products form part of a much larger market embracing both other products and labour. The labour component typically represents about half the market value, in some cases more, and many of the larger BACS suppliers are focusing increasingly on the service element of their delivery.

Once labour and other products are factored in, the BACS industry is worth almost 2.5 billion US dollars across Europe as a whole and will be increasingly central to the development of both artificial intelligence and the Internet of Things.

By Henry Lawson,
Senior Analyst, Worldwide Market Intelligence, BSRIA Ltd

 

Notes to editors:

To learn more about these trends, please view BSRIA’s 2020 update of its well-established BACS market reports.

To find out more contact us at:

 

 

Why use Business Focused Maintenance?

Why do we do maintenance? Is it to keep our assets in optimum working condition? Do we do it to make the equipment last longer? Perhaps the main goal is to prevent failures? If it is for any of these reasons you may find that you are working to an outdated ethos…

BSRIA has recognised and employ a more pragmatic approach for today’s business needs. BFM recognises that the building services’ equipment is installed to provide a service, thereby allowing a business function to be maintained. It analyses the business needs and consequences of failure first and foremost. This ensures that business function is maintained with the minimum of intrusive maintenance to minimise maintenance induced failure, otherwise it is traditionally assumed that the built environment’s asset failure follows the bathtub curve below.

BFM

There are standard specifications for maintenance within the building services industry that have been updated over the years such as SFG20. This is used by many organisations to enable them to tender for outsourced maintenance on a like-for-like basis. The main drawback from this approach is that the maintenance delivered would be generic across the site. This can increase costs and/or reduce the availability of human resources. Couple this with the often-quoted statistic that “70% of failures are due to ineffective maintenance” and it begs the questions to be asked over purely time-based PPM frequencies.

BFM recognises that the need for maintenance generally arises from business needs such as

  1. Complying with legislation
  2. Minimising health and safety risks
  3. Minimising business risks
  4. Managing business continuity
  5. Responding to business and customer requirements
  6. Adding value as part of the business process
  7. Reducing overall business costs
  8. Maximising whole life cost
  9. Increasing asset / system availability
  10. Increasing operational up time

Users of BFM – first published as a BSRIA Guide in 2004 – have demonstrated increased system availability and greatly reduced costs. There is a structured, six-step process to follow where the client and BSRIA work collaboratively to

  1. Assess business needs and consequences of asset failure
    • The goals of the business and the needs of the end users are assessed to ascertain which assets are crucial, and therefore the impact on the business of assets failing. The structure of BFM allows for this task to be done as objectively as possible and logged on a numeric scale of 1-10. 1 is a low consequence and 10 is a high impact on business continuity.
  1. Document functional block diagrams and assess functional resilience
    • review the systems and assess their ability to continue to meet the needs of the business when a failure occurs.
  1. Assess asset condition
    • A full condition survey as per BG 35/2012 taking into account all relevant influences on an assets condition, to provide a remaining life expectancy.
  1. Calculate likelihood of failure
    • converts the alpha-numeric score from tasks 3 and 2 to a 1-10 score via conversion table 6 in the BFM guide BG 53/2016.

BFM1

5. Calculate BFM score

    • combine the score from task 1 (BC) with the number calculated in task 4 (L) to give a BFM risk score on a scale of 1-100.

BFM2

6. Review of PPM tasks and frequency

    • Apply scores to the agreed level of risk set by the organisation. From this a revised maintenance schedule can be drawn up. BG 53/2016 suggests the following;
      • 1-9 Discretionary maintenance for non-critical assets
      • 10-40 Legal compliance and sector specific requirements
      • 41-100 Maintenance to provide the greatest level of confidence in asset reliability, performance and availability.

bfm5

Whilst every job is different, an indicative timeline can show you that BFM can very quickly make it’s impact on businesses.

The business-focused maintenance methodology challenges the planned preventative maintenance frequency of building services plant. The assessment methodology takes into account plant history (age, condition, failure history, plant loading, and maintenance history), the number of standby plant items (redundancy), and the level of resources available.

Many of the intrusive maintenance tasks can be replaced by Condition Monitoring (CM) which in turn leads to Condition Based Maintenance (CBM). The actual practice of CM is far quicker in terms of man hours than time-based PPMs and often involves zero down time to the asset and therefore no impact to the business. In addition to the usual array of gauges on an asset or its BMS sensor display that can be used to monitor plant performance, common CM methods include thermal imaging, vibration monitoring, acoustic emission monitoring and lubricant analysis.

Regular use of these methods at appropriate intervals can be far more cost effective than regular time-based generic intervals, whereas for non-critical plant, the most cost-effective maintenance methodology may be to run-to-failure. By applying the BFM methodology, you can be confident that you have selected the most appropriate maintenance technique for the services in your building.


This article was written by Nick Blake – Principal FM Consultant at BSRIA.

For more information about our research on maintenance and facilities management, please contact: consultancy@bsria.co.uk

To download our publication on Business Focused Maintenance (BG53/2016):
please click here>>

BSRIA's publications on maintenance and facilities management

 

AI in Buildings – The Vision and the Reality

BSRIA’s latest research into Building Automation Controls markets (BACS) has been released in February 2020. It confirms the growing importance of software in buildings with Artificial Intelligence (AI) playing a particular role.

What do we mean by AI in buildings? The term artificial intelligence (AI) tends to rear up in almost any current discussion about how to solve human, social or technical problems. While AI is almost as hard to define as intelligence itself, it is generally seen as embracing anything that goes beyond simply following fixed instructions of an “if x / then do y” nature.Picture1

It typically involves “learning”, finding patterns and correlations and extrapolating from these. More advanced AI can formulate hypotheses which can then be validated. The results can  range from relatively simple predictions, such as when I am most likely to want the heating to be on in my home, to highly complex ones involving a whole “world view”.

While the concept of AI has been around for more than 60 years, it is the combination of cheap, intensive processing power, almost unlimited data storage (often in the Cloud) and fast, reliable transmission of data that has made it a concrete and practical presence.

Buildings and their systems are clearly obvious candidates for AI. They are often large and complex and interact both with the people and with activities inside them as well as with the wider outside world in all kinds of ways, in a manner that can change radically over time.

Buildings are also heavy users of environmentally important resources such as energy (taking c. 40% of all energy consumption), having a big impact on human welfare and productivity.

Building systems that can adapt and operate “intelligently” and with less direct human supervision are increasingly sought after.

AI can play a role in almost any area of a building and its services. In terms of energy it can identify consumption patterns that are in some way abnormal, for example in its timing or in its intensity.

Fault prediction and prevention is another activity to which AI lends itself. By collecting, correlating and analysing information about when failures occur it is possible to predict where and when they might occur in future and to identify warning signs that can prompt preventative action. Where the equipment is critical, preventing outages can make a huge difference, saving money and potentially saving lives.

Alarms and security represent another obvious application for AI in ensuring that fires hazards are identified without false alarms, and that security video data is correctly interpreted, for example by identifying individuals as trusted or as potentially a threat.

AI can also extend into areas which have not always been much associated with building systems such as the monitoring of water quality. On a day-to-day basis, intelligent building systems can also ease the running of buildings, whether it is determining when rooms need to be cleaned or by guiding visitors’ cars towards free parking spaces.

As well as enhancing building functions, AI can transform the way that building users interact with the building, the most obvious example being speech recognition which, through products such as Amazon Alexa is already transforming the way many people interact with their homes and has applications in commercial buildings as well.

It is nonetheless important to keep the present state of AI in perspective.  A first key point is that artificial intelligence, like human intelligence, will always have limits and be prone to mistakes. It is for example practically impossible to predict every failure of a building system without generating any “false positives”. The trick is to strike the right balance, but this requires the accumulation of experience.

This is compounded by the fact that the organisations and individuals that understand buildings and their idiosyncrasies tend to come from a different background and culture to those that have been pioneering the development of AI. The successful implementation of AI in buildings requires a coming together of these two traditions.

In some cases, AI is “bought in” for example by mergers and acquisitions, in other cases companies attempt to recruit and build up their AI skills. CBInsights has monitored takeovers of AI companies, and found, perhaps unsurprisingly that the five highest numbers of takeovers were executed by the five US based tech giants, led by Apple. It is not a coincidence that four of these have actively engaged in smart homes or in other smart buildings

Picture2Source: CBInsight, BSRIA – each rectangle represents one buyer, scaled by companies bought

AI potentially reduces the need for some human skills, for example by making troubleshooting of building faults a much more automated process, but also increasing the need for other skills. Apart from the system engineers who design and implement the AI based solutions, building managers and users need to have enough understanding of those systems, and have the means to respond effectively.

For example, if a warning or alert is triggered by an intelligent system then either the problem needs to be corrected automatically or someone needs to have the knowledge and means to affect the chance.

The smarter, the more complex and the more connected the building, the more cyber security is likely to be seen as a potential threat. Significantly, cybersecurity is itself one of the main applications of AI.

The best current view is that, while AI is starting to have an impact on building services, it is still mostly in its early stages. If buildings were people, they would be just starting to walk on two legs and have some way to evolve before they could be seen as truly intelligent.

To learn more about the specific impact of software and AI on building automation, look for BSRIA  2020 update of its well-established BACS reports.

Please contact us to find out more:

  • America sales enquiries: BSRIA USA: sales@bsria.com ¦ +1 312 753 6800 www.bsria.com/us
  • China sales enquiries: BSRIA China: bsria@bsria.com.cn ¦ +86 10 6465 7707 www.bsria.com.cn
  • All other sales enquiries: BSRIA UK: wmi@bsria.co.uk ¦ +44 (0) 1344 465 540 www.bsria.com/uk

 

This article was written by
Henry Lawson, Senior Market Intelligence Analyst, BSRIA Ltd. 

International trends and the circular economy

Following on from the last edition of the Business Bulletin when I discussed international building trends and energy efficiency, one major trend that is gaining traction and deserves a closer look is the circular economy.

My observation is that the subject of circular economy is increasingly reported in the news and has long had a compelling case to be on the international agenda due to the urgency to respond to climate change and reduce carbon emissions. There are many cases of active programmes but to give a few examples:

  • The K’s Industrial Strategy Whitepaper1 came out on 27th November 2017, and outlined the U.K’s commitment to a circular economy as part of its clean growth strategy.
  • The E.U.’s 2018 Circular Economy Package2 comprises of an ambitious agenda to reduce plastic waste and has also devised a programme of introducing circular economy projects overseas to countries such as India, Japan and Indonesia.
  • On an international level, the World Economic Forum in conjunction with the renowned Ellen MacArthur Foundation3 has developed an international acceleration programme for businesses to embrace circular economy concepts.

So what is the relevance of the circular economy for us in the construction industry?  Well, it is not such a new subject: the earlier work of William McDonough and Michael Braungart and their Cradle to Cradle Design Framework4 was a forerunner along with Dame Ellen MacArthur’s original concept of ‘designing out waste’3.

David Chesire, in his very interesting book “Building Revolutions Applying the Circular Economy To The Built Environment5 discusses the rationale for their ideas.  Essentially, both concepts espouse philosophies of total sustainability but the former promotes a “reduce, reuse and recycle” philosophy adopting the ‘cradle to grave” manufacturing model from the Industrial Revolution. Whilst the latter advocates purposely designing projects from the outset to minimise waste or choosing processes and materials that obviate waste in the first place.   I feel both these visions are neatly encapsulated in the analogy Mr Chesire quotes of the cherry blossom tree that ‘makes copious amounts of blossoms and fruit without depleting the environment. It nourishes the soil, provides oxygen, absorbs carbon dioxide and provides habitats for many other organisms.’

infografica-circular-economy

So for us, how can we make ideas such as these more relevant to the international construction community?  How do we nurture the environment at the same time capitalise on this trend? BSRIA has been looking closely at this question and co-hosted an event in 23rd May 2018 to explore ideas.

I’d like to share some of the key messages from BSRIA / ECA event “Engaging the Circular Economy”6:

  • The circular economy has a simple mantra: make – use – return – make, and will impact every element of the built environment
  • Organisations need to have an holistic approach and be agile to change. Industry is not linear, we need to ‘make do’ with less resources.
  • The future of architecture and construction will need to play a key role in the transition to a circular economy: we will need to think of buildings as resource generators (energy, materials services) in their own right.
  • Our attitude to waste needs to change with zero waste to landfill an imperative for all, involving one hundred percent reuse and recycling.
  • Organisations should ensure they are optimising the efficiency of their building services by making the best use of materials, water and energy for the duration of the installed equipment’s lifetime.
  • We need to embrace more resource sharing schemes such as ‘swap shop’ office furniture and make the office ‘circular’ using remanufactured furniture; reusable containers; circular procurement and data.
  • We should capitalise on battery energy storage and other renewable energy resources such as solar PV and wind turbines
  • Organisations should improve understanding of design approaches, especially passive design to help reduce the demand for building services. Also challenging design briefs and materials to be used on projects, selecting best practice design calculations and reusing equipment are advisable.
  • We need to help overcome contractual, logistical, personnel and financial barriers by making better use of newer building methods and tools such as BIM, BREEAM new construction scheme and off-site construction.
  • The construction industry needs to make changes happen through:
    • Legislation on resources
    • Standards
    • Economic incentives
    • Clear national and international strategies
    • Compelling business cases
    • Client demand

So in conclusion: is the circular economy a glorified term for recycling or is this a whole new tool, the next step as it were, for organisations to gain competitive advantage? One interesting observation a colleague made recently is that there are plenty of ideas for creating value through energy efficiency and sustainability initiatives but arguably the real issue is how do you change a culture in an organisation, how do you really make an organisation change the way they do things? And I think that is the key question for all of us to think about and is reflected in Dame Ellen MacArthur’s philosophy of the need for fundamental change in the way we think about building design.

 

References

  1. Industrial Strategy Whitepaper: Building a Britain fit for the future

The U.K. Government, 27th November 2017
https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/664563/industrial-strategy-white-paper-web-ready-version.pdf

  1. European Commission: 2018 Circular Economy Package
    http://ec.europa.eu/environment/circular-economy/index_en.htm
  2. Ellen MacArthur Foundation
    https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/publications
  3. Cradle to Cradle. Remaking the Way We Make Things
    Braungart M, McDonough W
    North Point Press, 2002
  4. Building revolutions applying the circular economy to the built environment
    Chesire D
    Royal Institute of British Architects, 2016
  5. Material resource efficiency in construction. Supporting a circular economy

Adams K, Hobbs G

British Research Establishment, IHS Technology, 2017

  1. Staging engaging the circular economy event – inventiveness mother of necessity

Prosser C

Electrical Contractors Association, BSRIA, May 2018

http://www.bsria.co.uk/news/

  1. TM56 Resource efficiency of building services

Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers, August 2014

  1. The re-use atlas. A designer’s guide towards a circular economy
    Baker-Brown D
    Royal Institute of British Architects, 2017
  2. Planning for circular economy

Environmental Services Association, April 2017

  1. Circle of light

A discussion about lighting technology and sustainability.

Harvey N

Lighting Journal, March 2017, Vol.82(3), 24-25

  1. Whole-life carbon circular economy

This technical article explores approaches for achieving zero energy buildings.

Building (magazine), 2 December 2016, No.48, 44-49, 10 figs

  1. The energy in waste – its place in a circular economy

Cummings A

Energy World, February 2014, No. 423, 14-15

BSRIA’s Information Centre – Delivering Knowledge for the Future.

image028The traditional view of libraries is somewhat staid but BSRIA hopes to buck the trend with a keen, energetic team who is constantly thinking ‘out of the box’ and looking for new ways to deliver information. Blogs, tweets, apps, newsletters, YouTube videos and webinars – you name it – are just some of our newer services.
Our mantra is “How can we deliver value to our members and customers?” How do we deliver what you want and need without information overload, and how can we continually make our services fresh and interesting?
image005

This is where you, as members and customers, are pivotal. This is your information service and you need to tell us what you’d like. Call us on 01344 465571, or email: information@bsria.co.uk.

WHO ARE WE AND WHAT DO WE DO?

Click on our mini video to find out more about us:

 

image009 HISTORY

In brief, we offer the largest dedicated building services library in Europe, with
over 80,000 items. Started in 1955, and originally part of the Heating Ventilating Research Association (HVRA), BSRIA’s information centre has grown from small beginnings and amassed stock from various other specialist libraries, along the way. This year we are proud to celebrate our 60th Anniversary.

Our current online library of books and journal abstracts was originally inherited from the
National College for Heating, Ventilating, Refrigeration and Fan Engineering in 1960 and has been maintained and updated by BSRIA ever since. During this time there have been some key
milestones such as computerising our catalogue in 1980; launching our ‘Statistics Bulletin’ (now Business Bulletin) in 1976; and moving to a new information centre, also in 1976.

image009 SO WHO IS RUNNING THE LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES NOW?


Who answers enquiry when you call or email? Meet the team: Jayne, Nevena, Jo and Maria.

Jayne Jo Maria Web

xxx

Welcome to Jayne Sunley, BSRIA’s new Information Manager.

Some of you will have spoken to Jayne on the phone or communicated on email, but have you wondered what she is really like?

Jayne, tell us a bit about yourself

Well, I was born and raised in Corby, Northamptonshire or as some people like to call it little Scotland. I graduated from university in 2012 with a BA (Hons) in History and found my way to BSRIA where I’ve been ever since. I started as Information Assistant but I’ve recently been fortunate enough to be given the opportunity to lead our Information Centre.

What is the best thing about working at BSRIA?

By far the best thing about BSRIA is the people, staff and members alike. As cheesy as it sounds it’s rather like joining a family, the support network is there throughout.

What plans do you have for BSRIA’s library?

There are a few plans in the making for the Information Centre in coming years both internally and externally. We’re intending to improve our e-delivery services as well as introduce a new legislation service for our members. Internally we will be amalgamating the library into one system as opposed to several organisation methods we have now. There is also an intranet development project in the making.
image005


What is your favourite food and
drink?

I have a real weakness for anything Italian. Drink wise I’d have to say Irn Bru but I think that’s due to being half-Scottish.

What do you enjoy doing in your free time?

I’m currently studying for my MSc in Library Science so a lot of my free time is spent on reading an awful lot. But for purely enjoyment purposes I like to swim and going to gigs.

Where will you be for Christmas?

For Christmas this year I’ll be heading back towards home which is Northamptonshire where I’ll be consuming too much chocolate.

What films/books/music do you like?

I’m a big fiction fan ranging from classics to science fiction but sadly don’t get as much time to indulge anymore. Music is a big part of my life but it tends to be more rock or indie orientated whatever that means!

 

 FIND YOUR WAY AROUND OUR INFORMATION SERVICES AT A GLANCE:- image007

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